Skiing and Snowboarding USA Adventures in Snow

24Jul/130

Snowboarders, Skiers Still Doing Tricks On Snow At Copper –



COPPER MOUNTAIN, Colo. (CBS4) – It may have reached the 90s on Tuesday in Denver, but there are still some places in Colorado where people are enjoying the snow.

When the ski season officially ends in the spring, a new kind of work begins at Copper Mountain. Employees pile up snow in hopes of having it last through the summer months.

Copper Mountain (credit: CBS)

Copper Mountain (credit: CBS)

The effort is done so young people who attend a special summer camp at the Copper can still do some ski and snowboard tricks on snow.

“Most people are very surprised there is snow in the summer to even work on,” said Phoebe Mills, who heads the Woodward at Copper program. The program teaches the participants the vital skills to succeed in action sports.

The small snowy patch amid what is otherwise green, grassy runs on the mountainside is actually few hundred yards long. There are jumps and rails galore, and plenty of flips and 360s being performed by the campers.

Copper Mountain (credit: CBS)

Copper Mountain (credit: CBS)

The snow session ends in the morning, but the learning continues inside Woodward’s recently renovated barn.

“We’re able with our indoor facility — the foam pits, the spring floor, the trampolines — to break skills down to easily definable steps,” Mills said. “We’re doing front flips and back flips inside in a soft environment before we take them to snow. So that way we’re allowing kids to get a lot of repetition and muscle memory and skill before they take it onto the snow.”

Nico Nakamura, one of the camp participants, told CBS4 that his friends didn’t believe him when he said the other day that he was going snowboarding.

“They’re like, ‘How is that even possible?’ And you have to explain to them ‘Oh, they push all the snow in the run into the middle and it lasts all summer.’ Snowboarders will do anything to snowboard.”

Woodward at Copper Mountain

The indoor Woodward at Copper facility (credit: CBS)

CBS4 interviewed one 7-year-old at the camp who is already learning some impressive tricks at a very early age. Asher, a Winter Park resident, said he did four 360s on the snow on Tuesday morning.

“I’m learning how to ski better,” he said.

LINK: woodwardatcopper.com

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22Jul/130

Fayette snowboarder begins path toward Olympic dreams – Tribune

Chris Adamski
Freelance Reporter
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

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By Chris Adamski


Published: Monday, July 22, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Updated 4 hours ago

In order to someday achieve her goal of making the U.S. Olympic team, Shannon Branthoover is working as hard as she can — 180 degrees at a time.

Branthoover, a 15-year-old from Indian Head — about 10 miles from Connellsville — has been chosen to participate in the U.S. Snowboard Team's Development Program.

As part of the program managed by the U.S. Snowboard Team, Branthoover will travel and train with some of the best snowboarders and snowboarding coaches in the country and be evaluated and monitored on an ongoing basis. It is considered the first step to becoming an Olympic athlete.

“I'm so excited,� Branthoover said. “Overall, I'm just really glad I can be a part of everything. It's really awesome that girls snowboarding is getting out there more for everyone.�

Branthoover spent the past school year at Carrabassett Valley Academy in Maine, a private co-ed ski and snowboard academy at the base of Sugarloaf Mountain that boasts two-time Olympic snowboarding gold medalist Seth Wescott among its alumni. Branthoover is one of 10 from Carrabassett Valley Academy to be chosen to participate in the U.S. Development program.

“I had so much fun up there working with the coaches and getting to travel and learning new things,� said Branthoover, who carries a No. 59 overall world ranking, according to the World Snowboard Tour website.

Among Branthoover's highlights of the past year is placing second in the United States of America Snowboard Association nationals at Copper Mountain, Colo., this past spring. She also attended Project Gold Camp at Mammoth Mountain, Calif., last month.

“Shannon has worked very hard all season,� Carrabassett Valley Academy elite snowboard coach Kim Stacy said. “It was great to see it all come together at nationals, and we are pleased she has been chosen to participate in the national development program.�

Branthoover said she developed the itch for snowboarding at an early age but couldn't take lessons until she was 7. Living near Seven Springs, she trains there as much as possible.

“I think at my first competition, I was like 10 — and all my competitors were 20-something,� Branthoover said.

A seminal moment came at the Gatorade Free Flow Tour event at Seven Springs in 2012, when Branthoover won both the women's slopestyle and superpipe events.

Among Branthoover's best tricks is the wildcat, which she describes as “kind of a reverse cartwheel.� She also can do both front and reverse 360-degree spins.

In addition to the Olympics, qualifying to compete in the Winter X Games is chief among Branthoover's long-term snowboarding goals.

Chris Adamski is a freelance writer.

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20Jul/130

Good Wood Snowboard Test 2014 Preview

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The 2014 TransWorld Good Wood Board Testers. This year we split Good Wood into two tests. All-Mountain at Sierra-At-Tahoe, and our Park board test at Boreal and the Woodward West facilities.

Good Wood Board Test 2014 Preview

For this year’s Good Wood we split the snowboard test into two, we took 16 experienced testers to Woodward West at Boreal for the park test, and Sierra-at-Tahoe for the all-mountain portion. This is the first time we’ve split up the test like this, and we thought it was a good move allowing the testers to really hone in on a particular style of riding and mind set for each board category. You can’t beat the skatepark flow of the Woodward at Boreal runs and the long, variable runs at Sierra-at-Tahoe each made for perfect spots.

Stay tuned for the full Good Wood results coming out in the 2014 Gear Guide Issue August 1st. Subscribers get the issue earlier, so sign up for your subscription here and be the first to get the mags.

02_snowboard_test_good_wood_marq

Shane Fortier puts the Niche snowboard thru some heavy testing at the Park Board test at Boreal

Many thanks to Boreal and Sierra-at-Tahoe for making the test a reality. To Marley for the jams. Penske for the road warrior. Zico and Drink Water for the hydration. DaKine for keeping those screws tight. Beyond Coastal for blocking sunburns. To all the testers who generously volunteered their time.

The Crew: Aaron Kinsman, Alexa McCarty, Brandon Laxalt, Brian Gipson, Clint Vezie, Cristina Soresca, Dan Conroy, Hannah Fuller, Irving Sanchez, John Foy, Kari Dethelfsen, Max Tokunaga, Pat Hannon, Shane Fortier, Tawyna Schultz, Vanessa Lowe

04_good wood_sierra_Ben_Birk

2014 TransWorld Good Wood board testing crew

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18Jul/130

From ‘corpse’ to inspiration: Snowboarder’s recovery from traumatic brain …

Kevin Pearce at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, Jan. 21, 2013. (Larry Busacca/Getty Images)

On New Year's Eve 2009, five days before the 2010 Olympic snowboarding trials, 22-year-old Kevin Pearce was training in Park City, Utah, when he slammed his forehead into the icy wall of a half-pipe during a practice run, suffering brain trauma so severe he had to relearn how to walk and talk.

"I look like a dead man," Pearce told Outside magazine in 2011 while viewing a photo of his limp body at the bottom of the pipe. "I look like a ... corpse."

Pearce's three-and-a-half-year road to recovery — from corpse to commentator and international spokesman for traumatic brain injury awareness — is the subject of "The Crash Reel," a new documentary directed by Lucy Walker premiering Monday at 9 p.m. on HBO.

During his rehab, the New Hampshire native and longtime Vermont resident held onto hope he would return to competitive snowboarding, despite doctors telling him he could die.

"There was a long period of time where I thought I was filming someone who was committing suicide," Walker told USA Today. "And Kevin would get really badly hurt again because he was at such grave risk. I had no idea how it was going to turn out. I was very worried for a very long time, a year, that we wouldn't have a happy ending."

Pearce now admits he was being stubborn — which is, of course, a necessary part of being an extreme athlete.

"I was holding onto it and was kind of not really trying to let it go and not believing that I had this change in my life," Pearce, who still has memory loss and dizziness, said in January. "It wasn’t until I got back on my snowboard and could see where I was at that I really understood I needed to change my lifestyle."

That was in 2011, when doctors cleared him to snowboard for the first time since the accident. "I used to take it for granted," Pearce said on the chairlift on the way up the mountain. "I used to be like, 'God, why is this lift so slow? Get me to the top!' Now it's just nice to be up here."

Pearce, the son of glass artist Simon Pearce, launched a fund that supports families of victims of traumatic brain injuries. Simon Pearce designed a "Love Your Brain" glass bowl — with 100 percent of the profits from its sale going to the Kevin Pearce Fund — and the accompanying "Love Your Brain" campaign focuses on TBI awareness and "the need for everyone to recognize the importance of his or her brain."

"I’d never heard of a TBI," he said at Sundance. "I never knew what a traumatic brain injury was."

Pearce, who was wearing a helmet when he crashed, has become an unlikely safety advocate in a sport that carries plenty of risks. Three weeks before his fall, Pearce suffered a concussion during a preliminary run at an Olympic qualifying event in Colorado.

“I don’t sometimes like what I’m doing,” Shaun White, the gold-medal-winning snowboarder and Pearce's former rival, admits in the film. “I do it because I need the satisfaction and the fulfillment to make me feel better about myself, like I’ve achieved some new level that I never dreamed of. We make cars faster. We make trains faster. We innovate. We do that. It’s just what we do.”

The half-pipe where Pearce crashed was the same one where Sarah Burke, a 29-year-old extreme skier, went into cardiac arrest after suffering a tear in her vertebral artery during a training accident in 2012. Burke was resuscitated but placed in a medically induced coma. She died nine days later.

Pearce returned to Park City earlier this year to promote the film at Sundance, but didn't return to the site of the crash.

"I have no desire to go back there," he said.

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16Jul/130

From ‘corpse’ to inspiration: Snowboarder’s recovery from traumatic brain …

Kevin Pearce at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, Jan. 21, 2013. (Larry Busacca/Getty Images)

On New Year's Eve 2009, five days before the 2010 Olympic snowboarding trials, 22-year-old Kevin Pearce was training in Park City, Utah, when he slammed his forehead into the icy wall of a half-pipe during a practice run, suffering brain trauma so severe he had to relearn how to walk and talk.

"I look like a dead man," Pearce told Outside magazine in 2011 while viewing a photo of his limp body at the bottom of the pipe. "I look like a ... corpse."

Pearce's three-and-a-half-year road to recovery — from corpse to commentator and international spokesman for traumatic brain injury awareness — is the subject of "The Crash Reel," a new documentary directed by Lucy Walker premiering Monday at 9 p.m. on HBO.

During his rehab, the New Hampshire native and longtime Vermont resident held onto hope he would return to competitive snowboarding, despite doctors telling him he could die.

"There was a long period of time where I thought I was filming someone who was committing suicide," Walker told USA Today. "And Kevin would get really badly hurt again because he was at such grave risk. I had no idea how it was going to turn out. I was very worried for a very long time, a year, that we wouldn't have a happy ending."

Pearce now admits he was being stubborn — which is, of course, a necessary part of being an extreme athlete.

"I was holding onto it and was kind of not really trying to let it go and not believing that I had this change in my life," Pearce, who still has memory loss and dizziness, said in January. "It wasn’t until I got back on my snowboard and could see where I was at that I really understood I needed to change my lifestyle."

That was in 2011, when doctors cleared him to snowboard for the first time since the accident. "I used to take it for granted," Pearce said on the chairlift on the way up the mountain. "I used to be like, 'God, why is this lift so slow? Get me to the top!' Now it's just nice to be up here."

Pearce, the son of glass artist Simon Pearce, launched a fund that supports families of victims of traumatic brain injuries. Simon Pearce designed a "Love Your Brain" glass bowl — with 100 percent of the profits from its sale going to the Kevin Pearce Fund — and the accompanying "Love Your Brain" campaign focuses on TBI awareness and "the need for everyone to recognize the importance of his or her brain."

"I’d never heard of a TBI," he said at Sundance. "I never knew what a traumatic brain injury was."

Pearce, who was wearing a helmet when he crashed, has become an unlikely safety advocate in a sport that carries plenty of risks. Three weeks before his fall, Pearce suffered a concussion during a preliminary run at an Olympic qualifying event in Colorado.

“I don’t sometimes like what I’m doing,” Shaun White, the gold-medal-winning snowboarder and Pearce's former rival, admits in the film. “I do it because I need the satisfaction and the fulfillment to make me feel better about myself, like I’ve achieved some new level that I never dreamed of. We make cars faster. We make trains faster. We innovate. We do that. It’s just what we do.”

The half-pipe where Pearce crashed was the same one where Sarah Burke, a 29-year-old extreme skier, went into cardiac arrest after suffering a tear in her vertebral artery during a training accident in 2012. Burke was resuscitated but placed in a medically induced coma. She died nine days later.

Pearce returned to Park City earlier this year to promote the film at Sundance, but didn't return to the site of the crash.

"I have no desire to go back there," he said.

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